Photo provided by Meira Mizrahi

Photo provided by Meira Mizrahi

Maximising outcomes for shark and ray Marine Protected Areas

The use of spatial management tools such as marine protected areas (MPAs) has become a popular approach in shark conservation efforts. This project seeks to evaluate a range of biophysical and social factors that are likely to affect the success of MPAs  intended for shark conservation. We aim to produce a set of objective products that conservation decision makers, policy makers, funders, advocates and scientists can use to make informed decisions about the use of MPAs to improve population outcomes for sharks and rays.

 
 Photo provided by Meira Mizrahi

Photo provided by Meira Mizrahi

improving Impacts of Marine Protected Areas by using socioeconomic factors in placement decisions

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are not always placed in areas where they can maximise impact on conservation and livelihoods. Current MPA guidelines fall short in that they focus primarily on biophysical criteria for impact, with less consideration of interrelated socio-economic factors. This project aims to identify the socio-economic factors that influence effective placement of MPAs in terms of maximising impact, and investigate the influence that governance and other socio-political drivers have on placement choice.

 
IMG_3594.jpg

sportfishing for sustainable livelihoods in papua new guinea

Locally based sport fisheries in Papua New Guinea have the potential to provide stable alternative livelihoods and support conservation. This project aims to develop the necessary biological and socio-economic understanding required to support local sportfishing businesses in achieving these goals.

 
 Photo provided by Filip Milova (WorldFish), 2015

Photo provided by Filip Milova (WorldFish), 2015

contributions of Rural Aquaculture to livelihoods in the solomon islands

In the Solomon Islands, household tilapia aquaculture has the potential to contribute income and food to rural livelihoods. However, to date, this type of aquaculture production has failed to translate into sustainable, tangible benefits to rural farmers. This research explores the social dimensions of rural tilapia farming in the local context, and how geographic locality and access to market can influence choice and access to fish source-protein.

 
 Picture provided by Karin Gerhardt

Picture provided by Karin Gerhardt

understanding indigenous shark fisheries in far north queensland

Most fishery management tools are currently informed by western science and the role that Indigenous knowledge has in contributing to shark and ray research and management is not considered. We are working with the Yuku Baja Muliku Traditional Owners to evaluate how shark and ray research and management efforts may benefit from a holistic approach that recognizes Indigenous knowledge and the role of Indigenous knowledge holders.

 
 Photo provided by Clive Jones

Photo provided by Clive Jones

 expanding spiny lobster aquaculture in indonesia

Lobster farming is a an attractive livelihood opportunity for Indonesia because capture of seed lobsters and their grow-out involves simple technology, minimal capital and is ideally suited to village-based enterprises. However, Indonesian lobster farming remains at a developmental stage only, constrained by lack of farming skills and knowledge, limited access to support networks and credit, and incompatible policy and regulatory settings.

This project aims to increase the engagement of farmers in lobster grow-out, addressing the priority issues of improved survival of lobster seed through the nursery phase, and increased survival and growth of lobsters through grow-out.